Compact Discoveries®
a series of one-hour radio programs produced, written, hosted, and edited
by Fred Flaxman

©2013 by Fred Flaxman

Program 213
"Oscar-Winning Songs"

MUSIC: opening of Mancini/Mercer: Moon River [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 6] [under the following]

What does Moon River... Over the Rainbow... The Way You Look Tonight...Whatever Will Be, Will Be... Born Free... The Windmills of Your Mind;...You Light Up My Life; and Fame all have in common? Well, first of all, they are all Oscar-winning songs from Hollywood movies. And second, you will hear all of them and more if you stick with me for the next hour. I’m Fred Flaxman, and this is Compact Discoveries.

MUSIC:
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Let’s go in chronological order starting with The Way You Look Tonight by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields from the 1936 RKO film Swing Time. Other songs in Swing Time include "A Fine Romance", "Pick Yourself Up" and "Never Gonna Dance". The Oxford Companion to the American Musical calls Swing Time "a strong candidate for the best of the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals" and says that, although the screenplay is contrived, it "left plenty of room for dance and all of it was superb. … Although the movie is remembered as one of the great dance musicals, it also boasts one of the best film scores of the 1930s.”

MUSIC:
Kern/Fields: The Way You Look Tonight [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 1]  [3:10]


The Way You Look Tonight,  sung by Fred Astaire. Music by Jerome Kern. Lyrics by Dorothy Fields. From the 1936 RKO movie, Swing Time, starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

Our next selection, Over the Rainbow, is from the 1939 MGM film The Wizard of Oz. It was written by E. Y. “Yip” Harburg and Harold Arlen and is sung by Judy Garland. It is undoubtedly the single most revered movie song of them all. And yet it was originally deleted from the final cut of the film by MGM. They worried that it was too sad and sentimental.

MUSIC:
Harburg/Arlen: Over the Rainbow sung by Judy Garland [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 2]  [2:27]
 
Over the Rainbow sung by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz from 1939.

The 1944 Paramount Pictures musical comedy-drama, Going My Way, is about a new young priest taking over a parish from an established old veteran. It stars Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald and was directed by Leo McCarey. Crosby sings five songs in the film including Swinging on a Star, which we’ll hear next.

Going My Way was the highest-grossing picture of 1944, and was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, winning 7, including Best Picture. Its success helped to make movie exhibitors choose Crosby as the biggest box-office draw of the year, a record he held for the remainder of the 1940s. And Going My Way was followed the next year by a sequel, The Bells of St. Mary’s. After World War II, Bing Crosby and Leo McCarey presented a copy of the movie to Pope Pius XII at the Vatican.

MUSIC:
Jimmy Van Heusen/Johnny Burke: Swinging on a Star [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 3]  [2:32]

Swinging on a Star from Going My Way, music by Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke. Sung by Bing Crosby.

Now let’s hear from Judy Garland again. This time, a song from the 1946 MGM film, The Harvey Girls. It’s called On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, and it’s by Johnny Mercer and Harry Warren. The musical is about Fred Harvey’s once-famous traveling waitresses. New waitresses for Fred Harvey's pioneering chain of Harvey House restaurants travel on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway to the fictional town of Sandrock, apparently somewhere in Arizona.

MUSIC:
Mercer & Warren: On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, sung by Judy Garland [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 4]  [3:28]

Judy Garland sung On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, by Johnny Mercer and Harry Warren.  It was from the 1946 MGM musical called The Harvey Girls.

You are listening to “Oscar-Winning Songs” on this hour of Compact Discoveries. I’m your guide, Fred Flaxman.

Next here’s a song from an Alfred Hitchcock suspense film. “A song from an Alfred Hitchcock movie?” you say. “You mean a theme song?” No, I mean a song sung by a singer. In fact the singer is Doris Day. The song is Que Sera Sera, Whatever Will Be, Will Be. And the movie is The Man Who Knew Too Much starring James Stewart and Doris Day.

MUSIC:
Evans & Livingston: Que Sera Sera, Whatever Will Be, Will Be sung by Doris Day [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 5]  [2:07]

Whatever Will Be, Will Be, sung by Doris Day from the Alfred Hitchcock thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much. The song is by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston. The Paramount movie came out in 1956.

You are listening to “Oscar-Winning Songs” on Compact Discoveries. I’m Fred Flaxman.

[optional one-minute break not included in the total timing of this program]

In 1961 Paramount Pictures released Breakfast at Tiffany's, a romantic comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard, and featuring Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen, Martin Balsam, and Mickey Rooney. The film was directed by Blake Edwards. It is loosely based on the novella of the same name by Truman Capote.

Hepburn's portrayal of Holly Golightly as a naïve, eccentric café society girl is generally considered to be the actress' most memorable and identifiable role. She herself regarded it as one of her most challenging roles, since she was by nature an introvert, but was required to play an extrovert. The film’s theme song, Moon River, by composer Henry Mancini and lyricist Johnny Mercer won an Oscar for Best Song.

MUSIC:
Henry Mancini & Johnny Mercer: Moon River, performed by the Andy Williams orchestra and chorus, [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 6]  [2:43]

Andy Williams orchestra and chorus. Moon River from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Makes me want to see the film again.

We’re up to 1962 now in our review of Hollywood’s “Oscar-Winning Songs.” That was the year when Warner Brothers released the film Days of Wine and Roses, directed by Blake Edwards and starring Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick, Charles Bickford, and Jack Klugman. The film depicts the downward spiral of two average Americans who succumb to alcoholism and attempt to deal with their problem. Once again the Oscar-winning team of Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer were responsible for the music. Henry Mancini also conducts.

MUSIC:
Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer: theme from Days of Wine and Roses [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 7]  [2:09]

Henry Mancini’s music and Johnny Mercer’s lyrics for Days of Wine and Roses

In 1966 Columbia Pictures released Born Free, a British drama starring Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers as Joy and George Adamson. The Adamsons were a real-life couple who raised an orphaned lion cub to adulthood, and then released her into the wilderness of Kenya. The screenplay was written by blacklisted Hollywood writer Lester Cole under a pseudonym. It was based on Joy Adamson’s 1960 non-fiction book, Born Free. The movie was directed by James Hill. It won numerous awards including an Oscar for its music by John Barry.

MUSIC:
John Barry and Don Black: Born Free [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 8]  [2:52]

Matt Monro. Born Free.

You are listening to “Oscar-Winning Songs” on this hour of Compact Discoveries. I’m  Fred Flaxman.

[optional one-minute break not included in the total timing of this program]

The 1968 movie The Thomas Crown Affair, starred Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway. It was produced and directed by Norman Jewison. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, winning Best Original Song for Michel Legrand’s haunting song Windmills of Your Mind. The lyrics are by Alan and Marilyn Bergman. The singer is Dusty Springfield.

MUSIC:
Michel Legrand with Alan and Marilyn Bergman: Windmills of Your Mind [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 9]  [3:53]

Dusty Springfield. Windmills of Your Mind. The music is by Michel Legrand. Lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman. Like all of the songs on this hour of Compact Discoveries, this one came from disc two of the three-disc set on the Shout Factory label called “Hollywood Hits: 70 Years of Memorable Movie Music.”

The special set comes packaged in a beautiful odd-size book that distinctly will not fit on shelves designed to hold CDs. So I’m at a bit of a loss for where to store it!

Next, from the 1969 Twentieth Century Fox film, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, we’ll hear Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head.  This American western was directed by George Roy Hill and written by William Goldman, who won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the film. Paul Newman played Butch Cassidy. Robert Redford played his outlaw partner, the “Sundance Kid.” The music is by Burt Bacharach; lyrics by Hal David. The singer is B.J. Thomas.

MUSIC:
Burt Bacharach and Hal David: Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 10]  [3:16]

B.J. Thomas. Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head.

The 1977 Columbia Pictures romantic comedy-drama film, You Light Up My Life, was widely panned by critics, receiving a 20% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, a movie review website. Some cited Didi Conn’s sensitive portrayal and the title song as its most worthwhile features.

MUSIC:
Joe Brooks: You Light Up My Life [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 12]  [3:41]

The title song to the 1977 film, You Light Up My Life. Music by Joe Brooks. Singing by Kacey Cisyk.

The motion picture Fame was released by MGM in 1980. The musical follows a group of students through their studies at the New York High School of Performing Arts. The film is split into sections corresponding to auditions, freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. It spawned a TV series and spin-off, a stage musical, a reality competition series, and a 2009 film remake.

MUSIC:
Michael Gore and Dean Pitchford: Fame sung by Irene Cara [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 14]  [5:15]

Irene Cara and singers. Fame.

Arthur, the 1981 Orion comedy, stars Dudley Moore as Arthur Bach, a drunken New York City millionaire who is on the brink of an arranged marriage to a wealthy heiress, but ends up falling for a common working-class girl from Queens. It was the first and last film directed by Steve Gordon, who died the next year of a heart attack at age 44.
The film was notable for its title song, Arthur’s Theme: Best That You Can Do, co-written by Christopher Cross, Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, and Peter Allen, and it was performed by Christopher Cross. The film was nominated for a total of four Academy Awards. John Gielgud won Best Supporting Actor and the theme song won Best Original Song.

MUSIC:
Christopher Cross, Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, and Peter Allen: Arthur’s Theme: Best That You Can Do sung by Christopher Cross [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 15]  [3:56]

Christopher Cross. Arthur’s Theme: Best That You Can Do.

The 1985 Columbia Pictures release, White Nights, is a drama directed by Taylor Hackford and choreographed by Twyla Tharp. It stars Mikhail Baryshnikov, Gregory Hines, Jerzy Skolimowski, Helen Mirren, and Isabella Rossellini. The film is notable both for the dancing of Hines and Baryshnikov and for the Oscar-winning song, Say You, Say Me by Lionel Richie.

MUSIC:
Lionel Richie: Say You, Say Me sung by Lionel Richie [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 17]  [4:03]

Say You, Say Me, sung by the song-writer, Lionel Richie.

MUSIC:
opening of Mancini/Mercer: Moon River [Shout Factory TJL 826663-97645, CD 2, Track 6] [under the following]

You’ve been listening to “Oscar-Winning Songs” on Compact Discoveries. They all came from disc two of a three-CD set called “Hollywood Hits: 70 Years of Memorable Movie Music” on the Shout Factory label. I had time for 14 of the 19 cuts on that compact disc, so if you want to hear the Oscar-winning theme from Shaft, Last Dance sung by Donna Summer, Up Where We Belong from An Officer and a Gentleman, The Time of My Life from Dirty Dancing, and Let the River Run from Working Girl sung by Carly Simon, you’ll need to find a copy of the CD set.

But if you missed any of this program or would like to hear it again, that’s easy: go to compactdiscoveries.com on the internet, where you’ll find links to stream Compact Discoveries programs on demand without charge. You’ll also find information on every recording used in every program. This is program number 213. I’m Fred Flaxman. Thank you for listening!

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ANNOUNCER
(Steve Jencks): Compact Discoveries is made possible in part by Story Book Publishers and their latest offering, a tongue-in-cheek memoir by Compact Discoveries host Fred Flaxman called “Sixty Slices of Life ... on Wry: The Private Life of a Public Broadcaster.”  And by the financial support of Isabel and Marvin Leibowitz, and an anonymous donor from Palm Beach, Florida.

Total Program Timing: 58:00