145SunriseSunshineSunset

Compact Discoveries®
a series of one-hour radio programs produced, written, hosted, and edited by Fred Flaxman
©2008 by Fred Flaxman

Program 145
"Sunrise, Sunshine, Sunset"


MUSIC:
Glenn Miller: Sunrise Serenade performed by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra [RCA Victor/BMG 09026-68490-2, track 10] [3:23] [under the following]

Hello and welcome to Compact Discoveries. I’m your guide, Fred Flaxman.

Stay with me for the next hour and you’ll hear some of the best music ever written that was inspired by “Sunrise, Sunshine, and Sunset.” The compositions will include classical, semi-classical, and jazz classics, such as Sunrise Serenade by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra, recorded on May 17, 1939, with which I am opening the sun-worship festivities.

MUSIC: up to its ending

The best piece I have ever heard that musically invokes sunrise is the first movement of the American composer Ferde Grofé’s Grand Canyon Suite. It starts off very quietly, and very shortly introduces what sounds like the sounds of birds and insects. Yet even the best songbirds can’t equal Grofe’s gift for beautiful melodies.

This recording was made by the Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler in June, 1964.

MUSIC:
Grofé: “Sunrise” from The Grand Canyon Suite performed by The Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler [RCA Victor/BMG 6806-2-RG, track 2] [5:50]

“Sunrise” from The Grand Canyon Suite by Ferde Grofé. When I was growing up, this suite was one of my very favorite orchestral compositions. It still is. The suite also includes a movement called “Sunset,” which I’ll play for you at the end of this hour to conclude our section on music inspired by sunsets.

But for now, let’s stick with sunrise. In fact, Here Comes the Sun.

MUSIC: Harrison: Here Comes the Sun performed by the Armin Electric Strings with Ofra Harnoy, cello [ProArte CDD 446, track 12] [3:05]

Here Comes the Sun by George Harrison of the Beatles. It was performed by cellist Ofra Harnoy with the Armin Electric Strings on a ProArte compact disc dating from late 1980s.

MUSIC: Irving Berlin: I’ve Got the Sun in the Morning and the Moon at Night sung by Dean Martin [Chestnut CN1027, track 3] [2:54]

Irving Berlin’s I’ve Got the Sun in the Morning and the Moon at Night, sung by Dean Martin on a Chestnut compact disc.

You are listening to Compact Discoveries. I’m your guide, Fred Flaxman, and this hour is devoted to “Sunrise, Sunshine and Sunset.” The “Sunrise” section included Glenn Miller’s Sunrise Serenade, “Sunrise” from Ferde Grofé’s Grand Canyon Suite, Here Comes the Sun by George Harrison of the Beatles, and Irving Berlin’s I’ve Got the Sun in the Morning and the Moon at Night.

I’m ready now to move on to the second segment of this hour: music inspired by sunshine. Our major work for this section is the tone poem Cloud and Sunshine by the English composer, Frederic Cliffe.

Cliffe lived from 1857 until 1931 — a total of 74 years. But he left barely a half-dozen works spanning just 17 of these years. They include two symphonies, a violin concerto, a piece for contralto and orchestra, a choral, some songs, and the orchestral picture we are about to hear.

As a youth Cliff showed promising musical aptitude and was enrolled in the National Training School for Music, which became the Royal College of Music, under its very first principal, Arthur Sullivan of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. It was Sullivan who taught him composition. From 1884 until 1931 Cliffe was professor of piano there.

Cliff’s first symphony was hailed as a “masterpiece” by The Daily Telegraph, but after a seven-year period of composing substantial works, Cliffe had no record of further major composition and his works received few additional performances during his lifetime.

This performance of Cloud and Sunshine is by the Malmö Opera Orchestra conducted by Christopher Fifield. It is from a Sterling compact disc.

MUSIC: Cliffe: Cloud and Sunshine performed by the Malmö Opera Orchestra conducted by Christopher Fifield [Sterling CDS-1055-2, track 5] [14:26]

Cloud and Sunshine by Frederic Cliffe, performed by the Malmö Opera Orchestra conducted by Christopher Fifield.

You are listening to an hour of music inspired by “Sunrise, Sunshine and Sunset” on Compact Discoveries. I’m your guide, Fred Flaxman.

[optional one-minute break not included in total timing]

MUSIC: Kreisler: Hymn to the Sun, performed by violinist Nigel Kennedy with pianist John Lenehan [Naxos 8.557918, track 28] [2:57]

Fritz Kreisler’s transcription of Rimsky-Korsakov’s Hymn to the Sun. The original tune was an aria in Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera Le Coq d’or. The violinist was Nigel Kennedy; the pianist, John Lenehan. This was an EMI Classics compact disc recording.

MUSIC: Lennon & McCartney: I’ll Follow the Sun performed by The King’s Singers [EMI CDC 7 49556 2, track 14] [2:15]

MUSIC: J. McHugh & D. Fields: On the Sunny Side of the Street, Michael Rose Orchestra with The Rosebuds [Michael Rose Orchestra MRO-004, track 3] [3:24]

MUSIC: Berlin: Some Sunny Day sung by Bing Crosby [EMI/Capitol, 72438-5981-2-8, CD 3, track 16] [3:10]

Three popular classics. First we heard Lennon & McCartney’s I’ll Follow the Sun performed by The King’s Singers on an EMI compact disc. Then we listened to On the Sunny Side of the Street by McHugh and Fields as performed by the Michael Rose Orchestra with the Rosebuds from their CD “Michael Rose Live at WXEL.” I had the great opportunity of serving as WXEL’s producer of that program when I worked for them. And finally I played for you an EMI/Capitol Records CD of Bing Crosby singing Irving Berlin’s Some Sunny Day.

You are listening to “Sunrise, Sunshine and Sunset” on this hour of Compact Discoveries. We’ve just concluded the “Sunshine” section and are ready to move on to “Sunset.”

The English composer, Roger Quilter, was known for his art songs. He was born in 1877 and died in 1953. He was a homosexual who found it difficult to cope with his sexuality. After the loss of his nephew during World War II, he became mentally ill, dying at his home in London a few months after celebrations marking his 75th birthday. We’re going to hear “Summer Sunset” from his Three Part-Songs for Women’s Voices. The singers are Joanne Thomas, mezzo-soprano, and Amanda Pitt, soprano. David Owen Norris is the pianist. This is from a Naxos compact disc recording.

MUSIC: Quilter: Summer Sunset performed by the Joanne Thomas and Amanda Pitt [Naxos 8.557495, track 19] [1:44]

Roger Quilter’s Summer Sunset brings us almost to the sunset of our “Sunrise, Sunshine, Sunset” hour on Compact Discoveries. I have time for one more “sunset” piece, for which I’m going to return to Ferde Grofé’s Grand Canyon Suite.

MUSIC: Grofé: “Sunset” from The Grand Canyon SUite, performed by The Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler [RCA Victor/BMG 6806-2-RG, track 5] [4:23]

“Sunset” from The Grand Canyon Suite by Ferde Grofé. The Boston Pops Orchestra was conducted by Arthur Fiedler.

MUSIC: Glenn Miller: Sunrise Serenade performed by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra [RCA Victor/BMG 09026-68490-2, track 10] [under the following]

And that brings this hour of music inspired by “Sunrise, Sunshine and Sunset” to a close. I Hope you’ve enjoyed the wide variety of music I presented during the last hour. If you missed any of it or would like to hear it again, go to compactdiscoveries.com on the internet where you can stream most Compact Discoveries programs on demand. Look for program number 145. At the web site you’ll also find scripts for every Compact Discoveries program with complete information on every selection. There are articles there as well, listener reaction, and a list of stations broadcasting the programs.

This is Fred Flaxman thanking you for listening.

This program is a presentation of WPVM, Asheville, North Carolina, a broadcast service of the Mountain Area Information Network.

MUSIC: Ends at 57:30

ANNOUNCER [Steve Jencks]: Compact Discoveries is made possible in part by Story Books, publishers of The Timeless Tales of Reginald Bretnor, selected and edited by Fred Flaxman. Samples and ordering available at bretnor dot com, b-r-e-t-n-o-r dot com; and by Educate Yourself for Tomorrow, an on-line guide to 37 different Liberal Arts courses for personal development, including “Mozart and the Evolution of Western Music.” On the web at onlinehumanities.com.

Program Ends at 58:00


 
  ©2008 Compact Discoveries